Summit Shelter (Oregon) Snowshoe 15-Jan-2017

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

It took a few days following the Great Storm for the weather to return to being abundently clear and sunny and for us to feel the urge to try out the volumes of snow the Storm had dumped on us.  Having made the short snowshoe out-and-back to the South Brown Mountain Shelter before the Great Storm, we thought we’d try a little longer trip to the Summit Shelter.  This shelter sits in a cluster of nordic trails (more details here) just north of Highway 140 near Lake of the Woods, Oregon; trails that are readily accessible from the deluxe (it has ample parking AND a pit toilet) Summit Sno-Park. It was clear, sunny, and about 12ºF when we pulled in to the sno-park, with its great view of Brown Mountain to the south (post).

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Brown Mountain from Summit Sno-Park

Here the nordic trail maps are not much more than simple sketches showing the names and approximate alignments of the various trails. Fortunately, the trails themselves are well signed and marked with the usual blue plastic diamonds. The Powerline Trail leaves going east right from the sno-park and we took that trail for 0.25 miles over to its junction with the Lower Canal Trail, the major north-south connector trail.

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Starting north of the Lower Canal Trail

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

On the Lower Canal Trail

Pretty soon, we came to a junction with the McLoughlin Trail and turned east (right) on to that trail. There had been ski and snowshoe tracks (this area is closed to snowmobiles) on the Lower Canal Trail, which made travel easier, but once we got on the less-tracked McLoughlin, we quickly found out just how soft, deep, and unconsolidated the snow was. Even with snowshoes, we would sink-in at least 8 inches all the time and much, much deeper in selected spots. Snowshoeing is SOOO much more aerobic than just hiking on dirt!  Soon the word consolidated lost all meaning…

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

On the McLoughlin Trail

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

On the McLoughlin Trail

It was work, but the day was clear, sunny, and bright,

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

On the McLoughlin Trail

and the forest was amazingly quiet and fully decorated in all manner of snow fittings and sculptures. Truly stunningly beautiful!

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Still on the McLoughlin Trail

We passed a junction with the Petunia Trail and stomped on to where the McLoughlin Trail crosses the Pitt View Trail. Here we turned north (left) on to the Pitt View and were almost immediately rewarded with the only clear view we’d get of Mount McLoughlin all day.

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Mount McLoughlin from the Pitt View Trail

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Mount McLoughlin from the Pitt View Trail

The Pitt View Trail climbs a bit, and gently at that, but with the snowshoes it felt a lot steeper (still, we’d gain only 500 feet the whole day).  About 0.5 miles up the Pitt View, we came to its junction with the Petunia Trail and after consulting our sketch map,

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Map reading at the Pitt View-Petunia junction

we turned northeast (right) and headed up the Petunia,

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Up the Petunia Trail

past the Big Mac Trail junction, and on to the junction of the Petunia and McLoughlin Trails (the McLoughlin continues past where we left it earlier in the day and curves around to this junction and beyond),

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

At the Petunia-McLoughlin junction

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

At the Petunia-McLoughlin junction

and then swung south (right) on the McLoughlin for the last 0.25 miles to the shelter.

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Along the McLoughlin Trail to the Summit Shelter

Local snowmobile and nordic clubs maintain the Brown Mountain, Summit, Four Mile, and Big Meadow shelters, making sure they are stocked yearly with firewood for use by snowmobilers, cross-country skiers, hikers, and snowshoers. The shelters are open winter months to use to warm-up or in case of an emergency. The layer of snow on the shelter’s roof gives you an idea of what the Great Storm brought us!

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Summit Shelter

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Checking for mice

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

The shelter’s wood stove

The shelter was clean, neat, and fully stocked with wood but the stove was, sadly, not lit, otherwise we might have lingered for awhile. But, nay, after a cold snack, we started the return stomp, back down the Petunia to the Pitt View,

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Down the Petunia Trail

and then northwest (right) on to the Pitt View Trail toward the Lower Canal Trail. On the way down the Petunia, we passed some other snowshoers coming up, so our track going down was considerably firmer than it had been coming up.

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Northwest on the Pitt View Trail

The tracks of the other snowshoers made it easier for us all the way back to the Lower Canal Trail and then along it all the way back to the Summit Sno-Park.

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Returning on the Lower Canal Trail

Hard, but rewarding, work (6.3 miles; 500 feet of elevation gain) on a beautiful day through snow-blanketed, quiet forests, with a visit to a classic snow cabin thrown in for good measure. A long stretch of rainy, gloomy weather is forecast for the days ahead, so it felt good to get out and enjoy a full bluebird day!

Summit Shelter Fremont-Winema NF Oregon

Our track around the various nordic trails in this area

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